description

Inspiration Blog for a Mysterious Nameless Entity

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bluelucied:

cupotealeaves:

dark-zeblock:

I found some old art books today called ‘Celtic Art: The methods of Construction by George Bain’ Which, I found interesting. I only have 4 out of the 7, they are very old (From 55 years ago). I thought I would just share some scans from them, some people might find them useful. :)

Ohhhh horror vacui neat to see tutorials on it.

KNOTWORK *flips table* I have the rest of this book and it’s amazing and I’m trying to learn how to do it myself. IT’S SO TEDIOUS BUT I LOVE IT

Tagged with: #reference  #long post  #martqueue  #world building  
Anonymous said: I was wondering if you could offer me your opinion on something. Is drawing a talent that can be learned or is it an innate ability that can only be built/improved upon?

Well, for reference my first drawings that I published online all looked something like this:

image

That was from about when I was 13.  After drawing a lot back then and refusing to do much studying or practice, I just gave up.  I didn’t draw for years, I totally rejected the idea of drawing because I felt I wasn’t any good.  And that held me back a lot.  It wasn’t until I graduated high school in 2011 that I decided I’d really take art seriously.  I decided on Art School entirely last minute.  My drawings around this point in my life still weren’t quite exactly where I’d wanted them to be:

image

Again, I kept refusing to study for a couple months but I’d sort-of learned to imitate a very vague representation of reality through hundreds of trials-and-errors that some studies could have sorted out so much quicker.  I’d had it in my head that if I actually tried to study that I would try my hardest and still wouldn’t be good enough — and that was a hard thing to tackle.  It’d be soul-crushing, but I was being naive and I learned to recognize it.

By the end of the summer I did tackle that fear, and began studying like crazy.  I admit the amount of work I put into drawing was probably nearing the point of being unhealthy, but I enjoyed it and was happy with my results.

"I did this from reference, I’m not quite at the point where I can draw an eye like this from imagination but I have faith that with enough practice I’ll get there."  Is part of the caption to that image.

Let’s fast-forward to when I joined Tumblr in February 2012:

image

I’d basically started from making wobbly circles in MSPaint to being able to sketch something to this degree.  I’m still proud of it ‘cause it really made me think “Wow… I’d really come a long way!”

Then there’s one of my more recent quick-ish sloppy color studies:

image

And I still feel that I have a long way to go! But, I can definitely acknowledge that I’ve improved over the years from making squiggly circle-people for Gaia Online.

Back then I had no idea what I was doing, and it showed.  There was no “talent” to be had there.  I feel safe in saying that anyone could copy that first image pretty easily.  If I had my sketchbooks from 5th grade around I could show all of the points that I’d traced — because those were the only things that ever looked mildly good.  But I stuck with it ‘cause I enjoyed it, not because I particularly felt it was my thing, I didn’t really feel a sense of calling, but just did it because I could make it my thing.  I suppose that dream never really died ‘cause here I am still doing it 10-11 years later.

The sense of meaning and intent behind the art came later and was something I developed on my own as well from figuring out what I like and what I want to depict — and that’s always changing!

Drawing takes time.  A lot of time, because you’re never really done with it.  You don’t only learn to draw, you learn how you draw.  And that’s something artists never stop doing.  You’re never really ever finished.  It’s definitely something you learn to do better-and-better, and I think almost everyone can learn to do it if they set their minds to it and put in the work!  We all start from somewhere, I haven’t met an artist who hasn’t put in a lot of work to get to where they are, even if a lot of that work was early on when they were very young.

Some people naturally pick things up faster, some naturally put in more work, some do both, some go slowly at their own pace — and all of them can improve and become better-and-better.  All of them can be phenomenal at drawing.  So sorry for going off on a bit of a life story, but I think it holds enough evidence that it isn’t something you have so much as something that you learn, at least in my case.  And personally, I think that’s exciting!

Tagged with: #long post  #anonymous  #asks  
fashionsfromhistory:

Field Armour of Henry VIII
c.1544
Italy 

This impressive armor was made for Henry VIII (reigned 1509–47) toward the end of his life, when he was overweight and crippled with gout. Constructed for use both on horse and on foot, it was probably worn by the king during his last military campaign, the siege of Boulogne in 1544, which he commanded personally in spite of his infirmities. Originally, the harness was fitted with a detachable reinforcing breastplate, to which a lance-rest was attached, and a reinforce for the left pauldron (shoulder defense). A pair of exchange vambraces (arm defenses) remains in the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle.
The armor is described in the postmortem inventory of the king’s possessions, drawn up in 1547, as “of italion makinge.” Possibly, it was supplied by a Milanese merchant known in England as Francis Albert, who was licensed by Henry to import luxury goods, including armor, into England for sale. Subsequently, the armor was given to William Herbert (ca. 1507–1570), first earl of Pembroke, Henry’s esquire and an executor of his will. It is recorded at Wilton House, seat of the Pembroke family, from 1558 until it was sold in the 1920s. By the end of the eighteenth century, and until very recently, the armor was erroneously identified as having belonged to Anne de Montmorency (1493–1567), Constable of France, its royal English ownership having been forgotten.
The armor is an early example of the “anime” type, in which the breastplate and backplate are constructed of horizontal overlapping plates connected and made flexible by rivets and internal leather straps. The decoration, consisting of foliage, putti, running dogs, and Renaissance candelabra and grotesque ornament, is typically Italian.

MET

fashionsfromhistory:

Field Armour of Henry VIII

c.1544

Italy 

This impressive armor was made for Henry VIII (reigned 1509–47) toward the end of his life, when he was overweight and crippled with gout. Constructed for use both on horse and on foot, it was probably worn by the king during his last military campaign, the siege of Boulogne in 1544, which he commanded personally in spite of his infirmities. Originally, the harness was fitted with a detachable reinforcing breastplate, to which a lance-rest was attached, and a reinforce for the left pauldron (shoulder defense). A pair of exchange vambraces (arm defenses) remains in the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle.

The armor is described in the postmortem inventory of the king’s possessions, drawn up in 1547, as “of italion makinge.” Possibly, it was supplied by a Milanese merchant known in England as Francis Albert, who was licensed by Henry to import luxury goods, including armor, into England for sale. Subsequently, the armor was given to William Herbert (ca. 1507–1570), first earl of Pembroke, Henry’s esquire and an executor of his will. It is recorded at Wilton House, seat of the Pembroke family, from 1558 until it was sold in the 1920s. By the end of the eighteenth century, and until very recently, the armor was erroneously identified as having belonged to Anne de Montmorency (1493–1567), Constable of France, its royal English ownership having been forgotten.

The armor is an early example of the “anime” type, in which the breastplate and backplate are constructed of horizontal overlapping plates connected and made flexible by rivets and internal leather straps. The decoration, consisting of foliage, putti, running dogs, and Renaissance candelabra and grotesque ornament, is typically Italian.

MET

migizi:

aydenburd:

paintaloosa:

All right, here’s my contribution to the art tutorial infographic world, part 1 of 2.  I’ve noticed that even in professional illustration, so often the humans and environments and armor and whatnot is really, really great— correct anatomy, lighting, proportions, like ‘wow this is fantastic WAIT what is up with that HORSE?’

I suspect two things;

First is that I spend 15 hours a day, 365 days a year looking, touching, handling, and just generally being around horses.  

Second is that most people do not.  

Artists have lost touch with their connection to horses as contemporary society has lost touch with them.  Generally, we don’t have that constant presence of horses in our lives that previous generations did, as horses aren’t part of the everyday landscape any more.  They don’t work the fields, they don’t cart the goods, they don’t deliver the mail or transport you to the next town down the road.

However, we still see horses all the time— in movies, books, illustration, ads and logos, we are presented with the image of horses all the time.  So we assume ‘yes, I have seen horses often and I know what they look like.’  Because of our exposure, we as artists don’t always feel like we need to heavily reference the animals as if we were drawing something we don’t see everyday (say, like elephants or giraffes or sea cucumbers).  Our brain just kind of plugs in ‘horse shaped’ and we go with that.

And I suspect that ends up being where a lot of these common mistakes occur.  Dogs are familiar, but we can easily find a dog to draw from live, to see the way the shapes of its face are put together in 3-dimensions.  Cats, humans, birds… if we venture just a little ways outside our studios (or in some cases, inside), we can find live models to study easily.  

You can’t really do that with horses.  They’re a commodity, sequestered away behind fences on private farms and shuttered away in barns.   So few people really get the chance to be up close and have that hands-on experience to really learn how a horse is put together.

So here’s some things, based on my own experience both drawing and working with horses, that might help you if you find yourself needing to draw one for yourself.

The approach I took might be more complicated than absolutely necessary, but I tried to present the subject of ‘how to draw horses’ a little differently than I’ve seen it done before.  I hope someone finds it understandable, and more importantly, helpful!

If you share this, please don’t delete my commentary about it above. Thanks :3

Dem horse butts yo

horsies ;o;

Tagged with: #long post  #reference  #martqueue  

codymcmillen:

itsdeepforhappypeople:

jordanleeemerson:

gingersouldrinker:

So I found my metallic gel pens from last year, and did this over the course of the afternoon. I’m pretty stoked about how it turned out :}

Whoa! :D

MERMAID TRANSFORMATION

this was a good idea

Tagged with: #long post  #world building  #martqueue  
a-partial-new-world:

thewritingcafe:

For all you writers out there who want to create a language for your story.
When creating a new language, it’s important to think of these four things:
Is it a spoken language?
Is it a written language?
Is it a sign language?
Is it a combination of the above?
Once you’ve decided how your language exists, you can move on to the next steps:
What culture does it belong to? Try reflecting the culture within the language. The Dothraki in A Song of Ice and Fire center their language around horses as spoken of in this article. Think of the sound and what emotions it could be compared to.
How old is it? Decide how old your language is and its history. Language changes over time and borrows from other languages as it grows.
Is it a dead language? A dead language is a language that is no longer used in ever day life. If there is a dead language (like Latin) in your culture, what records exist of it? Several cultures use the Latin name for species all over the world and English speakers use Latin phrases all the time. Does anyone study this language? Does anyone know how to pronounce it? Are there any missing pieces?
Who uses it? Decide who uses this language. If it is spoken and there is more than one language used in the area, is there only a certain group of people who speak this language? If it is written, what is the literacy rate?
Once you’ve established the above, you’ll have down the basics of your language. Now we’ll move on to specific types of language:
Spoken Language:
Alphabet: Again, really think of how you want it to sound. Create a phonetic alphabet for the spoken language and build the vocabulary off that. 
Vocab: If the language is used sparingly in your story, start with the phrases you use first. Create words for these. See how they sound together. Keep track of these words and their various forms (past, present, plural, singular, etc.).
Grammar: Play with the sentence structure. In Latin, a verb is often at the end of the sentence. In Spanish, the adjective comes after the noun most of the time. Keep these structures consistent and don’t make it too confusing if you have trouble with this.
Translate: Translate everything you have into the language you write in, even if you don’t use it. Write as much detail as you can about your languages to make it as authentic as possible.
Style: What would be considered the “formal” style? If there is a written language, is the formal style used more often in writing than in speaking?
Accents: Does the pronunciation of words differ from place to place? It most likely will if the language is widespread. Accents are influenced by other cultures and languages. The accents of the southwestern US came from English accents while other southern accents came from the influence of France and Jamaica.
Stress: Know what syllables to stress. This will affect the pronunciation and overall sound of your language. 
Written Language:

Alphabet: Create the written alphabet. There are a few ways you can do this. One is making new letters for each letter you have in the alphabet you write in and another is creating letters that stand for phonetic sounds. The shapes of the letters should be consistent throughout the whole alphabet for a better aesthetic appeal for for easier writing.
Direction: Which way is this language written? From left to right? Right to left? Top to bottom?
Translation: If this language is separate from a spoken language, can it be pronounced? Or only translated to read in another language?
Accents: If you’re writing with the Latin alphabet, use accents sparingly. Make sure you know how they affect pronunciation before using them and don’t drench your language with them.
Forms: How many forms of writing are there? Is there a lowercase and an uppercase?
Sign Language:

Gestures: Think of what gestures may exist in your culture. Are there any friendly gestures? Any offensive ones? How often are they used?
Full Language: Is there a fully developed sign language? Was it created for those who are hearing impaired or for another reason? When writing this, don’t describe all the signs made unless what is being said might be important or meaningful to the story. Keep the description short.


Other:
Name the Language: Calling the language the “common tongue” is overdone, boring, and just plain lazy writing. Give the language a name.
Borrow: If you want, you can borrow root words from another language to base yours off of. You can also borrow grammar rules from other languages if you wish. Borrowing can often make this process easier for you and it may help readers familiar with the base language see the similarities in your new language.
History: What is the history of the language? Was it once dead and then brought back? Are there any negative connotations with certain words? What are the histories behind these words?
Create Your Own Language
How to Create a Language in One Day
Language Construction Kit
Using Invented Languages in Your Novel

I don’t usually reblog stuff, but this is just so relevant and complete, I couldn’t pass it up! Enjoy :D

a-partial-new-world:

thewritingcafe:

For all you writers out there who want to create a language for your story.

When creating a new language, it’s important to think of these four things:

  1. Is it a spoken language?
  2. Is it a written language?
  3. Is it a sign language?
  4. Is it a combination of the above?

Once you’ve decided how your language exists, you can move on to the next steps:

  1. What culture does it belong to? Try reflecting the culture within the language. The Dothraki in A Song of Ice and Fire center their language around horses as spoken of in this article. Think of the sound and what emotions it could be compared to.
  2. How old is it? Decide how old your language is and its history. Language changes over time and borrows from other languages as it grows.
  3. Is it a dead language? A dead language is a language that is no longer used in ever day life. If there is a dead language (like Latin) in your culture, what records exist of it? Several cultures use the Latin name for species all over the world and English speakers use Latin phrases all the time. Does anyone study this language? Does anyone know how to pronounce it? Are there any missing pieces?
  4. Who uses it? Decide who uses this language. If it is spoken and there is more than one language used in the area, is there only a certain group of people who speak this language? If it is written, what is the literacy rate?

Once you’ve established the above, you’ll have down the basics of your language. Now we’ll move on to specific types of language:

Spoken Language:

  • Alphabet: Again, really think of how you want it to sound. Create a phonetic alphabet for the spoken language and build the vocabulary off that. 
  • Vocab: If the language is used sparingly in your story, start with the phrases you use first. Create words for these. See how they sound together. Keep track of these words and their various forms (past, present, plural, singular, etc.).
  • Grammar: Play with the sentence structure. In Latin, a verb is often at the end of the sentence. In Spanish, the adjective comes after the noun most of the time. Keep these structures consistent and don’t make it too confusing if you have trouble with this.
  • Translate: Translate everything you have into the language you write in, even if you don’t use it. Write as much detail as you can about your languages to make it as authentic as possible.
  • Style: What would be considered the “formal” style? If there is a written language, is the formal style used more often in writing than in speaking?
  • Accents: Does the pronunciation of words differ from place to place? It most likely will if the language is widespread. Accents are influenced by other cultures and languages. The accents of the southwestern US came from English accents while other southern accents came from the influence of France and Jamaica.
  • Stress: Know what syllables to stress. This will affect the pronunciation and overall sound of your language. 
Written Language:
  • Alphabet: Create the written alphabet. There are a few ways you can do this. One is making new letters for each letter you have in the alphabet you write in and another is creating letters that stand for phonetic sounds. The shapes of the letters should be consistent throughout the whole alphabet for a better aesthetic appeal for for easier writing.
  • Direction: Which way is this language written? From left to right? Right to left? Top to bottom?
  • Translation: If this language is separate from a spoken language, can it be pronounced? Or only translated to read in another language?
  • Accents: If you’re writing with the Latin alphabet, use accents sparingly. Make sure you know how they affect pronunciation before using them and don’t drench your language with them.
  • Forms: How many forms of writing are there? Is there a lowercase and an uppercase?
Sign Language:
  • Gestures: Think of what gestures may exist in your culture. Are there any friendly gestures? Any offensive ones? How often are they used?
  • Full Language: Is there a fully developed sign language? Was it created for those who are hearing impaired or for another reason? When writing this, don’t describe all the signs made unless what is being said might be important or meaningful to the story. Keep the description short.

Other:

  • Name the Language: Calling the language the “common tongue” is overdone, boring, and just plain lazy writing. Give the language a name.
  • Borrow: If you want, you can borrow root words from another language to base yours off of. You can also borrow grammar rules from other languages if you wish. Borrowing can often make this process easier for you and it may help readers familiar with the base language see the similarities in your new language.
  • History: What is the history of the language? Was it once dead and then brought back? Are there any negative connotations with certain words? What are the histories behind these words?

Create Your Own Language

How to Create a Language in One Day

Language Construction Kit

Using Invented Languages in Your Novel

I don’t usually reblog stuff, but this is just so relevant and complete, I couldn’t pass it up! Enjoy :D

Tagged with: #long post  #martqueue  #World Building  

mandiieee:

Abandoned Places…

Makes you want to explore… doesn’t it?

odditiesoflife:

Mount Roraima

The incredible top of Mount Roraima, the 1.8 million year old sandstone plateau. It is also called Roraima Tepui or Cerro Roraima. The geological marvel is one of the oldest formations on Earth, a natural border between Venezuela, Brazil and Guyana in South America. The mountain is part of Venezuela’s Canaima National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Angel Falls is also part of this beautiful park. Roraima’s highest point is Maverick Rock at 2,810 meters (9,219 feet). For nature and landscape lovers, Mount Roraima is said to have some of the most fascinating hiking trails in the world.

Tagged with: #long post  #world building  #martqueue  #Tesca  #SyCol